Search

Turkey Rights Monitor - Issue 48

*Version en español

ARBITRARY DETENTION AND ARREST


Throughout the week, prosecutors ordered the detention of at least 309 people over alleged links to the Gülen movement. In October 2020, a UN Working Group on Arbitrary Detention (WGAD) opinion said that widespread or systematic imprisonment of individuals with alleged links to the group may amount to crimes against humanity. Solidarity with OTHERS has compiled a detailed database to monitor the Gülen-linked mass detentions since a failed coup in July 2016.



May 19: The Association of Lawyers for Freedom (ÖHD) reported that a prison in Van was arbitrarily denying parole to political prisoners who are eligible. In the interviews conducted by the prison administration to decide whether parole would be granted, inmates were asked personal questions about their political ideologies, including whether they would continue working for the HDP after their release.


ARBITRARY DEPRIVATION OF LIFE


May 19: A report by the Baran Tursun Foundation said that the police killed a total of 404 civilians, including 92 children in the last 13 years.


ENFORCED DISAPPEARANCES


No news has emerged of Yusuf Bilge Tunç and Hüseyin Galip Küçüközyiğit, former public sector workers who were sacked from their jobs by decree-laws during the 2016-2018 state of emergency and who were reported missing respectively as of August 6, 2019 and December 29, 2020, in what appear to be the latest cases in a string of suspected enforced disappearance of government critics since 2016.


May 18: The Human Rights Association (İHD) said in a statement that at least 1,388 people have been victims of enforced disappearance in Turkey in the last 40 years, with most of the cases taking place between 1980 and 2001.


FREEDOM OF ASSEMBLY


May 17: The police in İstanbul briefly detained two former public sector workers staging a sit-in to protest their summary dismissal from their jobs in the aftermath of a failed coup in July 2016.


May 17: The police in İstanbul blocked an environmental protest against the construction of a stone quarry in northeastern Turkey, briefly detaining 13 people.


May 18: The police in İstanbul blocked a commemoration event held by left-wing activists, detaining 15 people.


May 18: The Van Governor’s Office issued a ban on all outdoor gatherings for a period of 15 days. Through consecutive extensions the ban has been held in effect since November 2016.


May 19: The police in İstanbul detained seven people over a left-wing commemoration event.


May 19: The police in Batman briefly detained musician Ethem Tüzer while staging a one-person demonstration to commemorate the musicians who committed suicide due to financial problems during the Covid-19 pandemic.


Ethem Tüzer

May 20: The police in İstanbul blocked a socialist demonstration against Israel’s airstrikes on Gaza, detaining 15 people.


May 20: The police in Ankara blocked a commemoration event organized by leftist groups, detaining 13 people.


May 20: The police in Şanlıurfa detained Emine Şenyaşar and Ferit Şenyaşar while staging a sit-in protest to seek justice in the case of the killing of a family member by people close to the ruling party.


May 23: The police raided the houses of 10 people for attending Boğaziçi University protests, briefly detaining one of them who was found home.


May 23: The Kırklareli Governor’s Office issued a ban on all outdoor gatherings for a period of 15 days. The ban came amid numerous environmental protests to prevent the construction of a stone quarry in a village.


FREEDOM OF EXPRESSION AND MEDIA


May 17: A report released by opposition MP Gamze Akkuş İlgezdi found that media regulator RTÜK has imposed a record number of punitive measures against anti-government TV and radio stations over the past two years since a presidential system of governance with lesser checks went in to effect.


May 18: The European Court of Human Rights ruled that Turkey violated the rights of two journalists who were jailed for reporting on the leaked emails of former finance minister.


May 18: A Diyarbakır court ruled to block access to the Kızıl Bayrak news website.


May 19: Sümeyya Avcı, a teacher who was dismissed from public service after the 2016 coup attempt, was detained after she criticized the government in a street interview that attracted widespread attention on social media. Avcı was released the next day.


Sümeyya Avcı

May 19: An İstanbul court ruled to release journalist Pınar Gayıp from house arrest. Gayıp had been held under house arrest for more than five months on charges related to a left-wing political party.


Journalist Pınar Gayıp

May 20: Mob boss Sedat Peker confessed to involvement in a 2015 attack on the İstanbul offices of the Hürriyet daily on the orders of a lawmaker from the ruling party AKP.


May 20: A Zonguldak court ruled to block access to news reports about the revelations of notorious mobster Sedat Peker involving his ties to local mayor Selim Alan.


May 21: President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan made changes to a 2018 press card regulation, in a second attempt to make card cancellations easier.


May 21: An Ankara court ruled to block access to the personal website of mob boss Sedat Peker who has been making incriminating revelations about high-ranking Turkish officials, citing national security and public order reasons.


May 21: A court acquitted journalist Melis Alphan of terrorism charges. Alphan stood trial due to a photo she posted on social media during Newroz celebrations in Diyarbakır in 2015.


May 21: A Diyarbakır court ruled to block access to a web address used by the pro-Kurdish Jinnews website which is under a previously imposed ban from access.


May 22: The police in İzmir briefly detained Tacettin Çolak, a lawyer and the executive of a left-wing party, on charges of insulting the president, over a banner that was hanged on the building of his party.


May 22: The police in Diyarbakır detained a person over social media messages about an attack on the Diyarbakır military airbase.


May 22: The state-run Anadolu news agency fired reporter Musab Turan after he asked questions at a press conference about recent allegations of Interior Minister Süleyman Soylu’s links to the mafia.


May 22: The police raided the office of a news website owned by journalists Hadi Özışık and Süleyman Özışık, after they were targeted by the interior minister.


May 23: Van prosecutors indicted singers Fuat Ege and Rohat Aram, charging them with spreading terrorist propaganda, for singing a Kurdish song during Newroz celebrations in the city.


HUMAN RIGHTS DEFENDERS


May 21: An İstanbul court ruled to keep behind bars businessman and rights activist Osman Kavala, who has been kept in detention for three-and-a-half years.


Osman Kavala

JUDICIAL INDEPENDENCE & RULE OF LAW


May 20: Eyyüp Akbulut, a Şanlıurfa prosecutor who announced on social media that he had launched an investigation into circulars released by the Interior Ministry regarding coronavirus measures he claims are unlawful was suspended by the Board of Judges and Prosecutors (HSK).


Prosecutor Eyyüp Akbulut

KURDISH MINORITY


May 18: The police in Mardin conducted house raids in three district, detaining 14 people including former and current HDP executives.


May 18: The European Court of Human Rights ordered Turkey to pay damages to the Diyarbakır-based Amedspor football club and its former player Deniz Naki. The court said that Naki’s right to freedom of thought and expression and right to a fair trial were violated.


Deniz Naki

May 19: The Association of Lawyers for Freedom (ÖHD) reported that a prison in Van was arbitrarily denying parole to political prisoners who are eligible. In the interviews conducted by the prison administration to decide whether parole would be granted, inmates were asked personal questions about their political ideologies, including whether they would continue working for the HDP after their release.


May 21: Two Kurdish men were shot and seriously injured by Turkish security forces while trying to cross the border into Turkey from Iraq.


May 21: A court acquitted journalist Melis Alphan of terrorism charges. Alphan stood trial due to a photo she posted on social media during Newroz celebrations in Diyarbakır in 2015.


May 22: The police in Şırnak briefly detained lformer HDP district executive Bengin Karaviş.


May 23: The police in İstanbul detained six people, including a former HDP district executive.


May 23: The police in three provinces detained 20 people, including HDP members and executives, as part of an Adana-based investigation.


May 23: Van prosecutors indicted singers Fuat Ege and Rohat Aram, charging them with spreading terrorist propaganda, for singing a Kurdish song during Newroz celebrations in the city.


MISTREATMENT OF CITIZENS ABROAD


May 19: The wife of teacher Selahattin Gülen released a video, claiming that her husband was abducted on May 3 by operatives of the Turkish government in Kenya, for being a relative of US-based preacher Fethullah Gülen.


May 21: A Kosovar court accepted the indictment of three officials involved in the illegal deportation of six Turkish teachers to Turkey in March 2018. The teachers were sought by the Turkish authorities over their alleged links to the Gülen movement.


Six Turkish teachers who were illegally deported to Turkey with the help of high-ranking Kosovar officials

OTHER MINORITIES


May 17: A group of unknown individuals attacked a Syriac cave church in the southeastern province of Şırnak, destroying a number of Christian items inside.


May 17: Turkey was ranked 48th among 49 countries as regards the human rights of LGBT people, according to the 2021 Rainbow Europe Map published by the International Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual Trans and Intersex Association (ILGA).


May 21: A mufti in Düzce in his Friday sermon targeted the Jewish community and people with a migratory background from Thessaloniki.


PRISON CONDITIONS


May 17: Şeref Vatansever, a teacher who was jailed over alleged links to the Gülen movement, died of Covid-19 after contracting the disease in a Kocaeli prison.


Şeref Vatansever

May 19: Ten NGOs urged the Justice Ministry to provide an update on the spread of the Covid-19 pandemic in Turkey’s prisons, pointing out that no data has been released on the outbreak behind bars for months.


May 22: A prison administration in Diyarbakır denied treatment to inmate Emine Erol, despite her severe illness due to Covid-19 which she contracted behind bars.


May 22: New reports pointed to a criminal neglect on the part of the authorities in the case of academic Halil Şimşek, who died in a Çanakkale prison after contracting Covid-19 behind bars.


Halil Şimşek

TORTURE AND ILL-TREATMENT


May 18: The Turkey Human Rights Accountability Project (TUHRAP), a UK-based rights group, lodged applications concerning six Turkish officials involved in alleged incidents of torture as subjects for sanctions by the UK government under the newly adopted Global Human Rights Sanctions Regulations, commonly known as the UK’s Magnitsky Act.


May 19: Kurbani Özcan, a Kurdish prisoner who requested his transfer out of prisons in Trabzon and Giresun due to torture, was transferred to a Diyarbakır prison where his ill-treatment continued and officers broke his fingers, according to the statements of his mother.


May 20: Reports said that a PKK militant was tortured by soldiers in Diyarbakır after being captured wounded during an operation.



NÚM. 48 EN ESPAÑOL


DETENCIONES Y ARRESTOS ARBITRARIOS


A lo largo de la semana, los fiscales ordenaron la detención de al menos 309 personas por presuntos vínculos con el movimiento Gülen. En octubre de 2020, un dictamen del Grupo de Trabajo sobre Detención Arbitraria (WGAD) de la ONU afirmó que el encarcelamiento generalizado o sistemático de personas con presuntos vínculos con el grupo puede equivaler a crímenes contra la humanidad. Solidarity with OTHERS ha compilado una base de datos detallada para supervisar las detenciones masivas vinculadas al movimiento Gülen desde el fallido golpe de Estado del 15 de julio de 2016.



19 de mayo: La Asociación de Abogados por la Libertad (ÖHD) informó de que una prisión de Van estaba denegando arbitrariamente la libertad condicional a los presos políticos que cumplen los requisitos. En las entrevistas realizadas por la administración penitenciaria para decidir si se concedía la libertad condicional, se hacían preguntas personales a los reclusos sobre sus ideologías políticas, entre ellas si seguirían trabajando para el Partido Democrático de los Pueblos (HDP, por sus siglas en turco) tras su liberación.


PRIVACIÓN ARBITRARIA DE LA VIDA


19 de mayo: Un informe de la Fundación Baran Tursun afirma que la policía ha matado a un total de 404 civiles, incluidos 92 niños, en los últimos 13 años.


DESAPARICIONES FORZADAS


No se tienen noticias de Yusuf Bilge Tunç y Hüseyin Galip Küçüközyiğit, ex trabajadores del sector público que fueron despedidos de sus puestos de trabajo mediante decretos ley durante el estado de excepción de 2016-2018 y que fueron dados por desaparecidos, respectivamente, el 6 de agosto de 2019 y el 29 de diciembre de 2020, en lo que parecen ser los últimos casos de una serie de presuntas desapariciones forzadas de críticos del gobierno desde 2016.


18 de mayo: La Asociación de Derechos Humanos (İHD) dijo en un comunicado que al menos 1.388 personas han sido víctimas de desaparición forzada en Turquía en los últimos 40 años y que la mayoría de los casos tuvieron lugar entre 1980 y 2001.


LIBERTAD DE REUNIÓN


17 de mayo: La policía de Estambul detuvo brevemente a dos ex trabajadores del sector público que realizaban una sentada para protestar por su despido sumario de sus puestos de trabajo tras el fallido golpe de Estado de julio de 2016.


17 de mayo: La policía de Estambul bloqueó una protesta medioambiental contra la construcción de una cantera de piedra en el noreste de Turquía y detuvo brevemente a 13 personas.


18 de mayo: La policía de Estambul bloqueó un acto de conmemoración celebrado por activistas de izquierda, deteniendo a 15 personas.


18 de mayo: La Oficina del Gobernador de Van prohibió todas las reuniones al aire libre durante un periodo de 15 días. Mediante prórrogas consecutivas, la prohibición se ha mantenido en vigor desde noviembre de 2016.


19 de mayo: La policía de Estambul detuvo a siete personas por un acto de conmemoración de la izquierda.


19 de mayo: La policía de Batman detuvo brevemente al músico Ethem Tüzer mientras organizaba una manifestación unipersonal para conmemorar a los músicos que se suicidaron por problemas económicos durante la pandemia del Covid-19.


Ethem Tüzer

20 de mayo: La policía de Estambul bloqueó una manifestación socialista contra los ataques aéreos de Israel contra Gaza, deteniendo a 15 personas.


20 de mayo: La policía de Ankara bloqueó un acto de conmemoración organizado por grupos de izquierda, deteniendo a 13 personas.


20 de mayo: La policía detuvo en Şanlıurfa a Emine Şenyaşar y Ferit Şenyaşar mientras realizaban una sentada de protesta para pedir justicia en el caso del asesinato de un familiar por personas cercanas al partido gobernante.


23 de mayo: La policía allanó los domicilios de 10 personas por asistir a las protestas de la Universidad de Boğaziçi y detuvo brevemente a una de ellas en su vivienda.


23 de mayo: La Oficina del Gobernador de Kırklareli emitió una orden de prohibición de todas las reuniones al aire libre por un periodo de 15 días. La prohibición se produjo en medio de numerosas protestas medioambientales para impedir la construcción de una cantera de piedra en un pueblo.


LIBERTAD DE EXPRESIÓN Y DE PRENSA


17 de mayo: Un informe publicado por la diputada de la oposición Gamze Akkuş İlgezdi señala que el organismo regulador de los medios de comunicación, RTÜK, ha impuesto un número récord de medidas punitivas contra las emisoras de radio y televisión críticos al gobierno en los últimos dos años, desde que entró en vigor un sistema de gobierno presidencial con menos controles.


18 de mayo: El Tribunal Europeo de Derechos Humanos dictaminó que Turquía había violado los derechos de dos periodistas encarcelados por informar sobre los correos electrónicos filtrados del ex ministro de Economía.


18 de mayo: Un tribunal de Diyarbakır dictaminó el bloqueo del acceso al sitio web de noticias Kızıl Bayrak.


19 de mayo: Sümeyya Avcı, profesora que fue despedida de la función pública tras el intento de golpe de Estado de 2016, fue detenida tras criticar al gobierno en una entrevista en la calle que atrajo una amplia atención en las redes sociales. Avcı fue liberada al día siguiente.


Sümeyya Avcı

19 de mayo: Un tribunal de Estambul decidió liberar a la periodista Pınar Gayıp del arresto domiciliario. Gayıp llevaba más de cinco meses en arresto domiciliario por cargos relacionados con un partido político de izquierdas.


La periodista Pınar Gayıp

20 de mayo: El capo mafioso Sedat Peker confiesa su participación en un atentado perpetrado en 2015 contra las oficinas del diario Hürriyet en Estambul por orden de un legislador del partido gobernante AKP.


20 de mayo: Un tribunal de Zonguldak decide bloquear el acceso a las noticias sobre las revelaciones del famoso mafioso Sedat Peker sobre sus vínculos con el alcalde local Selim Alan.


21 de mayo: El presidente Recep Tayyip Erdoğan introdujo cambios en una normativa sobre el carné de prensa de 2018, en un segundo intento de facilitar la cancelación de tarjetas.


21 de mayo: Un tribunal de Ankara decidió bloquear el acceso a la página web personal del capo mafioso Sedat Peker, que ha estado haciendo revelaciones incriminatorias sobre altos funcionarios turcos, alegando razones de seguridad nacional y orden público.


21 de mayo: Un tribunal absuelve a la periodista Melis Alphan de los cargos de terrorismo. Alphan fue juzgada por una foto que publicó en las redes sociales durante las celebraciones de la fiesta de Newroz en Diyarbakır en 2015.


21 de mayo: Un tribunal de Diyarbakır decidió bloquear el acceso a una dirección web utilizada por el sitio web prokurdo Jinnews, cuyo acceso se había prohibido anteriormente.


22 de mayo: La policía de Esmirna detuvo brevemente a Tacettin Çolak, abogado y directivo de un partido de izquierdas, acusado de insultar al presidente, por una pancarta colgada en el edificio de su partido.


22 de mayo: La policía de Diyarbakır detuvo a una persona por mensajes en las redes sociales sobre un ataque a la base aérea militar de Diyarbakır.


22 de mayo: La agencia de noticias estatal Anadolu despidió al reportero Musab Turan después de que hiciera preguntas en una rueda de prensa sobre las recientes acusaciones de los vínculos del ministro del Interior, Süleyman Soylu, con la mafia.


22 de mayo: La policía allana la oficina de un sitio web de noticias propiedad de los periodistas Hadi Özışık y Süleyman Özışık, después de que fueran señalados por el ministro del Interior.


23 de mayo: Los fiscales de la ciudad de Van acusaron a los cantantes Fuat Ege y Rohat Aram de difundir propaganda terrorista, por cantar una canción kurda durante las celebraciones de Newroz en la ciudad.


DEFENSORES DE LOS DERECHOS HUMANOS


21 de mayo: Un tribunal de Estambul decidió mantener entre rejas al empresario y activista de los derechos humanos Osman Kavala, que llevaba tres años y medio detenido.


Osman Kavala

INDEPENDENCIA JUDICIAL Y ESTADO DE DERECHO


20 de mayo: Eyyüp Akbulut, fiscal de Şanlıurfa que anunció en las redes sociales que había iniciado una investigación sobre las circulares publicadas por el Ministerio del Interior en relación con las medidas contra el coronavirus que, según él, son ilegales, fue suspendido por la Junta de Jueces y Fiscales (HSK).


Eyyüp Akbulut

MINORÍA KURDA


18 de mayo: La policía de Mardin llevó a cabo redadas domiciliarias en tres distritos, deteniendo a 14 personas, entre ellas antiguos y actuales directivos del Partido Democrático de los Pueblos (HDP).


18 de mayo: El Tribunal Europeo de Derechos Humanos condenó a Turquía a pagar una indemnización por daños y perjuicios al club de fútbol Amedspor, con sede en Diyarbakır, y a su ex jugador Deniz Naki. El tribunal dijo que se había violado el derecho de Naki a la libertad de pensamiento y expresión y el derecho a un juicio justo.


Deniz Naki

19 de mayo: La Asociación de Abogados por la Libertad (ÖHD) denunció que una prisión de Van denegaba arbitrariamente la libertad condicional a los presos políticos que cumplían los requisitos. En las entrevistas realizadas por la administración penitenciaria para decidir si se concedía la libertad condicional, se hacían preguntas personales a los reclusos sobre sus ideologías políticas, entre ellas si seguirían trabajando para el HDP tras su puesta en libertad.


21 de mayo: Las fuerzas de seguridad turcas dispararon contra dos hombres kurdos, que resultaron gravemente heridos, cuando intentaban cruzar la frontera con Turquía desde Irak.


21 de mayo: Un tribunal absolvió a la periodista Melis Alphan de los cargos de terrorismo. Alphan fue juzgada debido a una foto que publicó en las redes sociales durante las celebraciones de Newroz en Diyarbakır en 2015.


22 de mayo: La policía de Şırnak detuvo brevemente al antiguo ejecutivo de distrito del HDP, Bengin Karaviş.


23 de mayo: La policía de Estambul detuvo a seis personas, entre ellas un antiguo ejecutivo de distrito del HDP.


23 de mayo: La policía de tres provincias detuvo a 20 personas, entre ellas miembros y ejecutivos del HDP, en el marco de una investigación en Adana.


23 de mayo: Los fiscales de Van acusaron a los cantantes Fuat Ege y Rohat Aram de difundir propaganda terrorista, por cantar una canción kurda durante las celebraciones de Newroz en la ciudad.


MALOS TRATOS A CIUDADANOS EN EL EXTRANJERO


19 de mayo: La esposa del profesor Selahattin Gülen publicó un vídeo en el que afirmaba que su marido había sido secuestrado el 3 de mayo por agentes del Gobierno turco en Kenia, por ser pariente del predicador estadounidense Fethullah Gülen.


21 de mayo: Un tribunal kosovar aceptó la acusación de tres funcionarios implicados en la deportación ilegal de seis profesores turcos a Turquía en marzo de 2018. Los profesores eran buscados por las autoridades turcas por sus supuestos vínculos con el movimiento Gülen.


Seis profesores turcos que fueron deportados ilegalmente a Turquía con la ayuda de altos funcionarios kosovares.

OTRAS MINORÍAS


17 de mayo: Un grupo de desconocidos atacó una iglesia católica siria rupestre en la provincia suroriental de Şırnak, destruyendo varios objetos cristianos en su interior.


17 de mayo: Turquía ocupa el puesto 48 entre 49 países en lo que respecta a los derechos humanos de las personas LGBT, según el Mapa Arco Iris Europa 2021 publicado por la Asociación Internacional de Lesbianas, Gays, Bisexuales, Trans e Intersexuales (ILGA).


21 de mayo: Un muftí de Düzce atacó en su sermón del viernes a la comunidad judía y a las personas de origen inmigrante de Salónica.


CONDICIONES CARCELARIAS


17 de mayo: Şeref Vatansever, profesor encarcelado por presuntos vínculos con el movimiento Gülen, murió de Covid-19 tras contraer la enfermedad en una prisión de Kocaeli.


Şeref Vatansever

19 de mayo: Diez oenegés instan al Ministerio de Justicia a que facilite información actualizada sobre la propagación de la pandemia de Covid-19 en las cárceles de Turquía, señalando que hace meses que no se publican datos sobre el brote entre rejas.


22 de mayo: Una administración penitenciaria de Diyarbakır negó el tratamiento a la reclusa Emine Erol, a pesar de su grave enfermedad debida al Covid-19 que contrajo entre rejas.


22 de mayo: Nuevos informes apuntan a una negligencia criminal por parte de las autoridades en el caso del académico Halil Şimşek, que murió en una prisión de Çanakkale tras contraer Covid-19 entre rejas.


Halil Şimşek

TORTURA Y MALOS TRATOS


18 de mayo: El Proyecto de Responsabilidad en materia de los Derechos Humanos en Turquía, (Turkey Human Rights Accountability Project, TUHRAP), un grupo de derechos con sede en Reino Unido, presentó solicitudes relativas a seis funcionarios turcos implicados en presuntos incidentes de tortura como sujetos de sanciones por parte del Gobierno británico en virtud del recién adoptado Régimen Global de Sanciones de Derechos Humanos, comúnmente conocido como la Ley Magnitsky de Reino Unido.


19 de mayo: Kurbani Özcan, preso kurdo que solicitó su traslado fuera de las cárceles de Trabzon y Giresun debido a las torturas, fue trasladado a una prisión de Diyarbakır, donde continuaron los malos tratos y los funcionarios le rompieron los dedos, según las declaraciones de su madre.


20 de mayo: Según los informes, un militante del PKK fue torturado por soldados turcos en Diyarbakır tras ser capturado herido durante una operación militar.